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Photographer John Lund flips his wig in this humorous self portrait and stock photo.
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Stock Photo ArticleCreating A Conceptual/Fine Art Stock Photo with Adobe PhotoshopPicture of the Devil - Creating a Stock PhotoFire Breathing DragonsConceptual Stock Photography - Sell Stock PhotosShooting People and Location Stock Photos AbroadRoyalty Free - Rights Managed - Micro Stock - Stock Photography PricingHindu Gods - The Hindu God Ganesha - Picture and StoryStock Photos…the Highest Form of Commercial PhotographyPictures of Dog Breeds - Shooting Stock Photos of Miniature PoodlesDominatrix Pictures - Photo Shoot and PhotoshopFemale Photography - Photographing the Human BodyPicture of a Wrecking Ball Produced with Adobe Photoshop ToolsPictures of Cows - Being Creative Taking Pictures of a CowPictures of Lions - The King of BeastsTaking Pictures of the Great Wall of ChinaShooting Stock Photos in the Himalayas – A Travel Adventure Photo-ShootPictures of Snakes - Taking Stock Photos in Mumbai, IndiaGetting Started in Stock Photography: Choosing Your Stock Photo Equipment CorrectlyStock Photos - Selling and Marketing Your Stock Photo ImagesPictures of Money - Lots of Different Kinds of Money PicturesUsing Sailboat Stock Image and PhotoShop to Make a Unique New Hot Stock PhotoSelling Your Photos as Greeting CardsFunny Monkey Pictures - Stock Photos and Pictures of Monkeys or BaboonsTiger Pictures - Shooting a Tiger for StockStarting a Stock Photo CareerFilling Small Business Needs in Stock PhotographyCreating Stock Photos with Strategic AlliancesPhotography Tips from a Pro on Shooting in Low LightThe Power of PositiveFunny Pictures - Funny Pics of Animals and PeopleBumbles, Blunders and Bad Luck!Crowd sourcing, Micro Stock and MoneyCreating a Conceptual Photo ImageThe (Information) Road to Stock Photography SuccessUse Your Photo Shoot Estimate as a Selling ToolHow to Generate Effective Ideas for Stock PhotosBlend Images - A Modern Day Stock Agency Photo Success StoryTaking Pictures of Backgrounds For Producing Great Stock PhotosHow to Shoot Successful Lifestyle Stock PhotosDiversify Your Stock Photo Business - Selling Photos on Mugs, T Shirts, and Printed Merchandise!Beginner Photography Tips - Understanding the Role of ApertureFive Quick Tips For Great Pet PhotographyTurning Doctor Visits Into Hot Selling Medical Stock PhotosSelling Stock Photos to the Largest Market of AllCreating A Successful Concept Stock PhotoChoosing the Right Stock Photo for Your Small BusinessMaking A Living At Stock PhotographyChoosing the Right Concept Stock Photo For Your BusinessHandshake Pictures and Images in Advertising and Business CommunicationsBeautiful and unusual Pictures of Lighthouses and Lighthouse Images with Beacons and Stormy SeasAnimal AnticsMotion FootageMassage Cats ArticleJohn's Galleries of unique stock picturesJohn's Stock Photo ArticlesFunny Pictures Of AnimalsPictures of Cute Cats Doing Funny ThingsFunny Pictures of Elephants Doing Extraordinary Things! Flying elephants, Disco ElephantsFunny Animals - Pictures of funny animals like cats, dogs, cows, and MoreFunny Dogs - Cute Puppies - Cute Dog Pictures - The Funniest Pictures on the Net.
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Stock Photos - Bumbles, Blunders and Bad Luck!

I no longer remember how it happened, but the metal fell across my power cable, shorted it out and blew up my power pack circuit boards and all.  End of shoot!  

circuit board - stock photo of a mans face pushing through a circuit board  
Circuit board - Face pushing through

 Stock picture of a light house in the middle of a cracked baren piece of land - dried mud


 

Cracked Earth Dry Mud Lighthouse Cloudy Blue Sky  
   Stock photo of a man parachuting with a dollar bill as the parachute - golden parachute    picture of tornedo - stock picture
  stock image of an exploding computer    Picture of conductor conducting orchestra of computers with instruments on the screens - stock photo
         
 

 

Bumbles, Blunders and Bad Luck!

Don’t do this!

Over the years I have had my share of near disasters, mistakes and lessons learned (or not).  I guess it all started back in the early seventies when the train hit my camera.  I was just starting out at the time and wanted to shoot a dramatic shot of a speeding train for my portfolio.  I went to the local camera store and talked them into loaning me a 20mm Nikkor wide-angle lens.  I set my camera up on a tripod near the tracks, real near the tracks. 

As the train approached I began firing and as soon as the engine passed I had to step back.  The noise and fury of a train just a few feet away hurtling by at more than fifty miles an hour was more than I could handle.  I backed away about a dozen feet and watched in horror as the train sucked my camera and tripod right into it.  When the train finally passed I recovered the pieces, glass, pieces of circuit boad etc.  Never did find the third leg of my tripod.  You should have seen the salesman at the camera store when I poured his lens back onto the counter!

A blown power pack and a glass of Coke

In another example of “don’t do this”, also involving a train, I was hired to photograph the interior of one of the huge diesel locomotive engines.  The cylinders are literally large enough to climb down into.  Anyway, I set the lighting up with a balcar studio power pack and three heads.  I was shooting with a Hasselblad.  Once I got a Polaroid looking pretty good I switched to film. 

After three or four exposures somehow a piece of metal dislodged from somewhere, I no longer remember how it happened, but the metal fell across my power cable, shorted it out and blew up my power pack circuit boards and all.  End of shoot!  Having only three or four exposures for a large photo shoot is a little unnerving!  When I got home I found my wife laying in a lounge chair and reading a book. 

I leaned over to kiss her hello and that one roll of film fell out of my pocket and into her glass of Coke!  Yikes!  I snatched the roll out and spent a sleepless night in worry until I could get the film into the lab the next day.  As it turned out, the roll was wound tightly enough that, amazingly, there was no damage.  The shoot turned out fine!

In a more recent episode, for a stock shoot, I decided to shoot a businessman using a fire extinguisher on a computer.  I set up a cubicle in my studio.  On a count of three I had my model take aim and let loose with the extinguisher.  By the third frame (and I was shooting as rapidly as the camera would fire) I could no longer see the model! The studio was filled with a thick cloud of yellow dust (monoammonium phosphate). We couldn’t see, we couldn’t shoot, we had to cancel the rest of the day.  When I moved out of that studio two years later we were still finding small piles of yellow dust.

In another brilliant move I embarked on a three-day stock shoot in a remote part of Mexico.  I took with me a Profoto B power pack (Battery pack rated at 1200 watt seconds) and two heads.  Somehow, I forgot to bring the charger!  Of course, I didn’t realize it until the first day of shooting.  Luckily the pack was fully charged before I left and I managed to get a whole day of photography accomplished.  Days two and three though were a real struggle. The shoot was primarily indoors. I shot with my Canon 1Ds MKII rating the speed at 800 and imploring my models to look natural and hold still!  I had a lot of shots that just didn’t work, but in the end it turned out OK. Phew!

Earthquakes, empty film holders and bad synch speeds

Not everything has always been my fault though.  I once had to re-shoot when my film was caught in the processor during an earthquake, had an entire batch of 40 rolls of film mistakenly (this really was the lab’s mistake) pushed 2 stops, film shot from a helicopter no less.

Other mistakes I have made over the years: Forgot the camera on an annual report shoot; Photographed the board of directors of a major corporation with empty 4x5 holders; had the wrong synch speed set when shooting a portrait of the CEO of Chevron, and showed up for a 4x5 shoot with no tripod (darned assistants!). 

It’s been a long and exciting journey and I wouldn’t trade it for anything.  But it isn’t over yet; it is actually getting more exciting all the time!  I truly believe that this is the greatest time ever to be a photographer.  I wake up excited and eager to get to work almost every morning.  Who could ask for anything more than that!