john lund

underline

PHOTOGRAPHY


Photographer John Lund flips his wig in this humorous self portrait and stock photo.
PORTFOLIOS
STOCK / CATEGORIES
ARTICLES
Stock Photo ArticleCreating A Conceptual/Fine Art Stock Photo with Adobe PhotoshopPicture of the Devil - Creating a Stock PhotoFire Breathing DragonsConceptual Stock Photography - Sell Stock PhotosShooting People and Location Stock Photos AbroadRoyalty Free - Rights Managed - Micro Stock - Stock Photography PricingHindu Gods - The Hindu God Ganesha - Picture and StoryStock Photos…the Highest Form of Commercial PhotographyPictures of Dog Breeds - Shooting Stock Photos of Miniature PoodlesDominatrix Pictures - Photo Shoot and PhotoshopFemale Photography - Photographing the Human BodyPicture of a Wrecking Ball Produced with Adobe Photoshop ToolsPictures of Cows - Being Creative Taking Pictures of a CowPictures of Lions - The King of BeastsTaking Pictures of the Great Wall of ChinaShooting Stock Photos in the Himalayas – A Travel Adventure Photo-ShootPictures of Snakes - Taking Stock Photos in Mumbai, IndiaGetting Started in Stock Photography: Choosing Your Stock Photo Equipment CorrectlyStock Photos - Selling and Marketing Your Stock Photo ImagesPictures of Money - Lots of Different Kinds of Money PicturesUsing Sailboat Stock Image and PhotoShop to Make a Unique New Hot Stock PhotoSelling Your Photos as Greeting CardsFunny Monkey Pictures - Stock Photos and Pictures of Monkeys or BaboonsTiger Pictures - Shooting a Tiger for StockStarting a Stock Photo CareerFilling Small Business Needs in Stock PhotographyCreating Stock Photos with Strategic AlliancesPhotography Tips from a Pro on Shooting in Low LightThe Power of PositiveFunny Pictures - Funny Pics of Animals and PeopleBumbles, Blunders and Bad Luck!Crowd sourcing, Micro Stock and MoneyCreating a Conceptual Photo ImageThe (Information) Road to Stock Photography SuccessUse Your Photo Shoot Estimate as a Selling ToolHow to Generate Effective Ideas for Stock PhotosBlend Images - A Modern Day Stock Agency Photo Success StoryTaking Pictures of Backgrounds For Producing Great Stock PhotosHow to Shoot Successful Lifestyle Stock PhotosDiversify Your Stock Photo Business - Selling Photos on Mugs, T Shirts, and Printed Merchandise!Beginner Photography Tips - Understanding the Role of ApertureFive Quick Tips For Great Pet PhotographyTurning Doctor Visits Into Hot Selling Medical Stock PhotosSelling Stock Photos to the Largest Market of AllCreating A Successful Concept Stock PhotoChoosing the Right Stock Photo for Your Small BusinessMaking A Living At Stock PhotographyChoosing the Right Concept Stock Photo For Your BusinessHandshake Pictures and Images in Advertising and Business CommunicationsBeautiful and unusual Pictures of Lighthouses and Lighthouse Images with Beacons and Stormy SeasAnimal AnticsMotion FootageMassage Cats ArticleJohn's Galleries of unique stock picturesJohn's Stock Photo ArticlesFunny Pictures Of AnimalsPictures of Cute Cats Doing Funny ThingsFunny Pictures of Elephants Doing Extraordinary Things! Flying elephants, Disco ElephantsFunny Animals - Pictures of funny animals like cats, dogs, cows, and MoreFunny Dogs - Cute Puppies - Cute Dog Pictures - The Funniest Pictures on the Net.
GREETING CARDS
PRINTS / GIFTS
INTERVIEWS
ABOUT / CONTACT JOHN
   
facebook
twitter
GooglePlus

 

To sell stock photos you must first have an idea, then execute it properly.

The Images below are a few examples of conceptual stock images that the author has created.

  Picture of flying elephant

picture of road leading off into the distance-future       

 
Picture of man pushing a boulder up hill
 
Picture of a lighthouse in a storm
 
 
Picture of a business man 0ut-on-a-limb picture of todler trying to open a childproof pill bottle
     
  
 

To sell stock photos you must first create the images. This article explains how to develop an idea and how to implement it for a profitable image.

To sell stock photos you must first create them. Here is how by an expert.

Focus on stock that sells

To succeed at selling stock you need three things: Ideas, execution, and distribution. We will save getting distribution channels for another time, but in the following I will outline my step by step approach to coming up with ideas, determining if they are appropriate for my stock efforts, for and insuring that I get the ideas done and off to the distributors.

I have a set of criteria for stock images that helps me to focus on images that have the best chance of earning me money. First, the simpler the image is the better. A quick read beats a complex one almost every time. Plus, now that images are chosen on the internet you have to catch a buyer’s interest with a thumbnail. Secondly, the less expensive the image is to produce the better. A few of my successful stock images: a coffee cup with lipstick on it, a sink full of dirty dishes, a monitor tossed in a garbage can. If I can shoot an image in an hour with virtually no expenses…that equals pure profit. Third, I like timeless images…a rooster at sunrise, a gang of Harley Riders, Stampeding long horn cattle…these are images that will never be dated and will therefore always send me at least some profit.

I also have a couple of tests I can use on a stock image idea. Can you put a headline to it? If you can, then you probably have a winner. Will the image stop someone seeing it? Sometimes I can’t figure out what the heck someone would use an image for…but experience tells me that if the image can grab a viewer’s attention…then art directors will find a way to use it.

One additional thought…if you’ve made it…send it in. Several times I have debated with myself whether or not to send an image in…and when I finally thought, what the heck I’ll send it in…the image more often than not has turned out very successful. In one case the image ended up being used by the agency for the cover of its Catalog…in another case the image was used by an agency for the cover of a CD it was sending out. One image that I debated sending in actually had a $17,000.00 sale the first month I sent it in!

 

Finding Ideas for Stock Images

Ideas are all around us. I find my ideas in magazines, newspapers, the internet…in life around me…even on the radio. I was driving in heavy traffic one day when the traffic reporter used the term bottleneck…and it popped into my head to create an overhead view of several roads merging into one lane…a bottleneck. That image has earned me thousands of dollars now. It is a conceptual image that can be used to illustrate themes about communication, the internet, bandwidth and so forth. The essential component for coming up with ideas…is intention. If I set the intention to come up with ideas then I can almost always use any situation or stimulus as raw material to come up with stock ideas.

Your creativity is a muscle, so use it. I find that the more I practice at coming up with ideas the easier it gets. Several times I have interrupted my “practice” of coming up with stock ideas to pursue other projects. Each time I have found that it takes a while for me to get back up to speed. I have to admit that sometimes I feel like I have run out of ideas…but if I set that intention…in an hour, a day…sometimes two and I am back on track.

Keep a master list…forever.

When I get an idea I write it down. I have lists all over the place. I also keep a master list. Whether the ideas are good or bad…I write them down. Some ideas seem great as they pop into my head…but later seem pretty lame…and then yet even later they seem great again. So I keep a master list…and when I create one of those ideas I mark it…but still leave it on the list. The list can serve to prompt additional ideas and variations of ideas…it is an invaluable creative tool for success in selling your stock images.

Execute!

Ideas are great…but with out execution and distribution ideas aren’t worth much…and you certainly won’t sell stock images! So how do I execute? I sit down and mentally go through the process of creating the image. This is a crucial step and done diligently it provides me with a list of the materials and steps that I will need to take. I write these steps and materials down. Then I take each step that I will need to do and put it down on my calendar … from finding models and locations to what work I will need to do in Photoshop. If I miss a deadline I simply give that particular task a new deadline. And I keep at it until it all gets done.

I also have a policy that if I am not on a shoot I spend my morning either creating images (I use Photoshop for creating almost all of my conceptual stock images), or for getting images out to my various agencies. I save all my administrative duties for the afternoons. Since implementing that policy my productivity has soared. The “administrative “ duties never end…so if I try and get them out of the way first there never seems to be time to do the really important work…making images and getting them into the distribution channels.