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Photographer John Lund flips his wig in this humorous self portrait and stock photo.
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Stock Photo ArticleCreating A Conceptual/Fine Art Stock Photo with Adobe PhotoshopPicture of the Devil - Creating a Stock PhotoFire Breathing DragonsConceptual Stock Photography - Sell Stock PhotosShooting People and Location Stock Photos AbroadRoyalty Free - Rights Managed - Micro Stock - Stock Photography PricingHindu Gods - The Hindu God Ganesha - Picture and StoryStock Photos…the Highest Form of Commercial PhotographyPictures of Dog Breeds - Shooting Stock Photos of Miniature PoodlesDominatrix Pictures - Photo Shoot and PhotoshopFemale Photography - Photographing the Human BodyPicture of a Wrecking Ball Produced with Adobe Photoshop ToolsPictures of Cows - Being Creative Taking Pictures of a CowPictures of Lions - The King of BeastsTaking Pictures of the Great Wall of ChinaShooting Stock Photos in the Himalayas – A Travel Adventure Photo-ShootPictures of Snakes - Taking Stock Photos in Mumbai, IndiaGetting Started in Stock Photography: Choosing Your Stock Photo Equipment CorrectlyStock Photos - Selling and Marketing Your Stock Photo ImagesPictures of Money - Lots of Different Kinds of Money PicturesUsing Sailboat Stock Image and PhotoShop to Make a Unique New Hot Stock PhotoSelling Your Photos as Greeting CardsFunny Monkey Pictures - Stock Photos and Pictures of Monkeys or BaboonsTiger Pictures - Shooting a Tiger for StockStarting a Stock Photo CareerFilling Small Business Needs in Stock PhotographyCreating Stock Photos with Strategic AlliancesPhotography Tips from a Pro on Shooting in Low LightThe Power of PositiveFunny Pictures - Funny Pics of Animals and PeopleBumbles, Blunders and Bad Luck!Crowd sourcing, Micro Stock and MoneyCreating a Conceptual Photo ImageThe (Information) Road to Stock Photography SuccessUse Your Photo Shoot Estimate as a Selling ToolHow to Generate Effective Ideas for Stock PhotosBlend Images - A Modern Day Stock Agency Photo Success StoryTaking Pictures of Backgrounds For Producing Great Stock PhotosHow to Shoot Successful Lifestyle Stock PhotosDiversify Your Stock Photo Business - Selling Photos on Mugs, T Shirts, and Printed Merchandise!Beginner Photography Tips - Understanding the Role of ApertureFive Quick Tips For Great Pet PhotographyTurning Doctor Visits Into Hot Selling Medical Stock PhotosSelling Stock Photos to the Largest Market of AllCreating A Successful Concept Stock PhotoChoosing the Right Stock Photo for Your Small BusinessMaking A Living At Stock PhotographyChoosing the Right Concept Stock Photo For Your BusinessHandshake Pictures and Images in Advertising and Business CommunicationsBeautiful and unusual Pictures of Lighthouses and Lighthouse Images with Beacons and Stormy SeasAnimal AnticsMotion FootageMassage Cats ArticleJohn's Galleries of unique stock picturesJohn's Stock Photo ArticlesFunny Pictures Of AnimalsPictures of Cute Cats Doing Funny ThingsFunny Pictures of Elephants Doing Extraordinary Things! Flying elephants, Disco ElephantsFunny Animals - Pictures of funny animals like cats, dogs, cows, and MoreFunny Dogs - Cute Puppies - Cute Dog Pictures - The Funniest Pictures on the Net.
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Selling Your Photos as Greeting Cards

Some card companies have good over seas distribution, others have none. 

Picture of cat that ate the canary   picture of bull dogs dancing with santas hats on    Sweet picture of cats
 cute bunny rabbit picture         picture of dogs on motorcycles         picture of dogs dancing the tango
 cute cat photo - three cats are buddies          sweet cute puppy picture         funny picture of animals in a vetinary waiting room

How to sell your photo greeting cards and make a profit.

A little over seven years ago I approached a greeting card company about starting a line of greeting cards.  The planets must have been aligned right because the company agreed to give it a try…and it worked!  We sell hundreds of thousands of cards a year through out the world.  The images have also been used in gift books, printed on checks, used on calendars, posters, journals and even coffee mugs.  Through this experience I have learned a few things, which I now hope to pass on to you.

To Self-Publish or Not?

If you want to make any appreciable money I would rule out self-publishing.  Sure, you get to keep a much larger percentage of the money, but you have to ask yourself if want to sell photos or run a publishing company.  Without going into a lot of detail, just think of the logistics of printing, selling, delivering, invoicing, collecting, dealing with returns…hopefully you get the idea.  Just for a quick example, I was once on the phone with a photographer who was starting his own greeting card company.  He said he had to end the call because the printer had just delivered 250,000 greeting cards, and they were folded wrong!  Can you imagine? No thanks!  His greeting card company is no longer around.

Finding a Publisher

To find a publisher just go to where greeting cards are sold and see who is publishing what.  Your best chance to interest a publisher is to find one who carries the kind of work that you do.  A publisher who distributes vintage Black and White humor cards is not likely to be interested in your close up flower shots.

Too, you have a much better chance of catching a publisher’s interest if you present a series rather than just one or two images.  If I were looking for a publisher at this point I would mock-up a dozen cards, complete with inside text.  The cards would work together.  Some would be birthday cards and some would be for other holidays. Make it easy for a potential publisher to visualize what they would be selling.

Fee or Royalty?

If you believe in your images, take the royalty.  The first greeting card that I licensed to my publisher, a smiling cat with a canary feather in its mouth, had I accepted a flat fee, would have brought me around $800.00.  So far the royalties have come in at well over $5,000.00.

Research Your Greeting Card Publisher

Some card companies have good over seas distribution, others have none.  Some have their cards in mass-market retailers (Target, Walmart), others primarily distribute through small card shops.  Some have their own sales force while others rely on agents that represent a number of card companies.  Take the time to research the card company and make sure they are someone you want representing your work and you.  This will be a partnership with more give and take than you might expect.  It is a good idea to know your partner. 

While you are researching, check how the publisher likes work to be submitted.  It is a good bet that if you don’t take the time to pay attention to what they want, they might not take the time to pay attention to your work.

Negotiate Wisely

Before signing a contract make sure you understand the terms.  They may want to have the right to negotiate any further licensing of your images.  Not a good idea.  Do they want worldwide rights?  If so, do they have worldwide distribution?  How quickly and how often do they pay?  Do they offer an advance, and how much? Try contacting one of their artists and see what they think of the publisher. Take the time to understand every aspect of the contract, and don’t make the mistake of thinking that they will be looking out for you. They may like you, but they won’t be looking out for you.

By the way, most royalties start at 5%.  I started at 5%, but as my work sold well and I became more valuable I was able to increase the percentage of my royalty.  When you negotiate you can try to trade off a higher advance against a lower royalty or visa versa.  Everything is on the table.  In my case I eventually granted exclusivity for a higher royalty and managed to get my logo on the back of the cards too.

Creativity and perseverance

Getting your own line of greeting cards is a long shot.  But it is possible.  Do your research and find the right publisher.  Prepare your submission meticulously and to their specifications.  Submissions to multiple companies at once are fine. Use creativity, common sense and exercise perseverance.  Oh yeah, and take the royalty.